ABC Casts Robin Givens in ‘Once Upon a Time’

ROBIN GIVENS JOINS ONCE UPON A TIME

Robin Givens Joins ‘Once Upon a Time’ Cast

Actress Robin Givens is set to join the cast of ABC’s long-running fairy tale drama Once Upon a Time. In the wake of six cast members exiting the show last season, the network has added several new characters for their re-booted seventh season, including Tiana from Princess and the Frog. The title character will be played by Mekia Cox and Robin will reportedly play her mother, Queen Eudora.
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Robin Givens Returning to TV

ROBIN GIVENS - RIVERDALE - THE CW0

Robin Givens Joins ‘Riverdale’ Cast on The CW

Robin Givens is returning to television via her first co-starring role since 1996’s Sparks. The former Head of the Class actress has been cast to play Mayor Sierra McCoy in Riverdale, the upcoming CW drama based on the Archie comic book series.
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I’m Team Robin Givens

Who do you think should take over the role of Valerie ‘Val’ Stokes on VH1’s hit series ‘Singles Ladies?’

Though many names have been thrown around, only one actress in my book can single handedly pull off the role AND add a new dynamic to the character’s somewhat lackluster personality.

And though the actress I have in mind may not seem like the most obvious choice, I think if you are familiar enough with her work, then you know she can easily pull off the role of Val, AND add an extra bit of spice that I believe the character needs.

So who am I talking about, you ask? Well, the one and only Robin Givens, of course.

Robin has long been one of Hollywood’s most underrated black actresses. Despite that, however, she has still managed to show amazing depth in the roles she has taken on, and at a healthy 46-years of age, she still has a killer face and body to match.

I can totally see Robin in this role and hope that whoever casts the role of Val, looks outside the typical names that are being thrown around at the moment.

Robin Givens, Taraji Henson Added To “Prey” Cast

Robin Givens Blackfilm.com has learned that Taraji P. Henson, Robin Givens, and Cole Hauser have been added to the cast of Tyler Perry’s The Family That Preys Together. Already included in the cast are Sanna Lathan, Rockmund Dunbar, Alfre Woodward, Kathy Bates, and Tyler Perry. The story focuses on two families from different sides of the tracks that become intimately involved in love and business. It is the first Perry film with a prominent storyline that involves white characters. Perry will also handle directing duties on the film with Reuben Cannon. Lionsgate will release the film on September 12, 2008. Tyler Perry’s Family That Preys began shooting March 2nd at Tyler Perry Studios in Atlanta. For the record, Jennifer Hudson is NOT in the film- as previously reported.
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Robin Givens: Queen Of Media

A few weeks ago urban gossip queen Wendy Williams alluded that the actress who would be portraying her in the movie Queen Of Media, would be someone huge- whom we all knew. I spent but a brief moment wondering who it could be, but yesterday Wendy let the cat outta the bag when she told the world, live on her show, that actress Robin Givens would be bringing her larger than life persona to the big screen. I know many people may find the casting a bit off as Robin and Wendy look nothing alike. Neither did Tina Turner and Angela Bassett, but no one would argue that Angela played Tina to perfection. I believe Robin will do the same for Wendy. After all, Wendy’s look can easily achieved, it is her personality that Robin will really have to capture and I think the sista has the acting chops to pull it off.
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Robin Givens Back In The Spotlight

Robin Givens: Grace Will Lead You Home I freely admit to being a Robin Givens fan and always felt she got a bum rap from the media and the Black community in general who labeled her a gold digger. As you all know Robin married Mike Tyson back in 1988 when he was the World’s Heavyweight Boxing Champion and a beloved figure of the media. Their marriage was tumultuous to say the least and they were divorced just a year later. Tyson walked away from the short lived marriage unscathed but Robin suffered a career fallout and was labeled the most hated woman in America. Since then the sista has starred in a few low budget movies and appeared on a few shows here and there, but her career never really recovered and almost 20 years later, and at the insistence of Oprah Winfrey, Robin has written a book to finally tell her side of the story.
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Robin Givens Returning To Television

Actresses Robin Givens and Mel Harris have joined the cast of MyNetworkTV’s upcoming serialized drama “Saints and Sinners,” scheduled to premiere in 2007. Additionally, Natalie Martinez who appears as Michelle Miller in the network’s current series, “Fashion House,” is also joining the “Saints and Sinners” cast. The announcements were made today by Paul Buccieri, president, programming, Twentieth Television.
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Comfortable Chains: A Call for Black Women to Break Out

As a psychologist and a Black woman, I acknowledge the commonly held perception that to be a Black woman means we have to be super strong, invincible, and without feelings. In essence, this perception robs us of our humanity.

Social scientists have developed the term the Strong Black Woman Syndrome which refers to Black women who feel the need to handle everything alone without ever showing any sign of need or vulnerability. I was reminded of this syndrome as I read Rihanna’s recent interview with Rolling Stone magazine. In the interview, she talks about not wanting to look like a victim and not wanting to be perceived as weak. She stated that she worked to present herself as strong until it felt true. This is common for many Black women, including those who have survived trauma, violence, and abuse. It is not that we are immune to pain; rather, we believe it is unacceptable to show our pain. Black women receive the message from people outside of and within our community that we should not reveal our scars. In fact, one study with Black women who have survived intimate partner violence indicated that the women perceived that the Black community overall views them as weak and undeserving of care. This fear of being dismissed as weak silences many women. Audre Lorde wrote the poignant words, “This woman is Black so her blood is shed into silence.”

This concept can be witnessed in Rihanna’s testimonial in that, regardless of the very public way in which her story was told, her actual narrative and perspective have been silenced. Rihanna stated she felt the need to figure it out by herself after just one session of therapy. What keeps her and others silent?

We have seen what happens to Black women who speak of their pain, especially if the person who caused the pain is also Black. In fact, there has yet to be an instance in contemporary times where a Black woman has been harmed by a Black male and the Black community collectively rallied to her defense. Whether it is Anita Hill, Robin Givens, the adolescent violated by R. Kelly, or, more recently, the 11 year old girl gang-raped in Texas, Black women and girls receive the message that their pain is their problem and fundamentally their fault. As a result, they are encouraged to remain silent. Rihanna has learned this lesson well. As a young witness to domestic violence and now a survivor of dating violence, Rihanna has altered her mindset to the point where she can silently find “pleasure” in the pain, comfort in the chains.

The challenge is to extinguish the pressure for Black women to wear the silent mask of superhuman strength in the most dangerous and dehumanizing situations. As I read Rihanna’s interview, I thought of all the Black women who work daily to do the impossible, bear the unbearable, and carry loads that would break any woman’s back. Yes, I celebrate those who show resilience in the eye of the storm. However, it is not enough to simply survive and just get through it. Black women need to be whole. We need to know real happiness and authentic peace. Maya Angelou says, “Survival is important. Thriving is elegant.” To get to a point of thriving, we have to heal. We have to have space to breathe, tell our stories, and tend to the broken pieces. This is not a process that we can rush. It is not a process we should have to do alone. And, it is not a process we should endure in silence. I hope more Black women will get uncomfortable with the physical and psychological chains that bind us so we can break free and live. We do have the right to remain silent, but we have a stronger, more constructive right to speak up about the abuse we have survived and the wounds that still need to be healed.

Thema Bryant-Davis, PhD

Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Pepperdine University and author of Thriving in the Wake of Trauma: A Multicultural Guide.